Tag Archives: Greece

Golden Eagle Grabs for Gusto: in Russia, Sicily, Athens, USA

28 Oct
img_5123

Natasha Baker, Sales and Marketing Director for Golden Eagle Luxury Trains, left, with Eleanor Flagler Hardy, President of the Society of International Railway Travelers.®

It’s a journey of immense proportions: St. Petersburg to Moscow and on to the Pacific Ocean.

In 26 days, you’ll traverse Russia’s river and rail networks on board the luxurious MS Volga Dream and Golden Eagle Trans-Siberian Express.

Natasha Baker, Golden Eagle Sales and Marketing Director, broke the news of this exciting trip — and much more — today at our office during a whirlwind U.S. visit.

“It’s the perfect way to see Russia in its entirety,” Ms. Baker said. The Grand Tour of Russia runs July 12 – Aug. 6, 2017.

Beginning in St. Petersburg, the MS Volga Dream takes in some truly incredible scenery as it ventures towards Moscow.

Following three days in the ancient Russian capital, guests board the Golden Eagle for its epic, 5,772-mile journey to the Pacific Ocean.

For details on this landmark tour — it runs just once next year — click here.

Meanwhile, Ms. Baker had more to share for 2017:

  • The Golden Eagle Danube Express, operating from its home base in Budapest — will offer new “superior deluxe cabins” — four to a car — each with a double bed.
  • New GE Danube Express trips next year include Budapest-Athens and Venice-Sicily.

The Sicily trip offers different routes within Italy. Travelers new to Italy should opt for the north-bound tour, she says. Repeat visitors would prefer the south-bound route.

Finally, Ms. Baker honored us with this scoop:

Golden Eagle plans to run two trans-continental luxury rail trips in the U.S. in 2018 — one of which spends two nights in our home town of Louisville, KY! (Those visiting our fair city should be ready for Society of IRT festivities!)

The big 2019 news concerns the 150th anniversary of the Trans-Continental Railway in the U.S. We’ll let Ms. Baker make the announcement in the video below.

(Hint: It has to do with steam.)

(Actually, Ms. Baker said “centenary” in the video. “I really do apologize,” she said later. “I was getting mixed up with 100th year anniversary of the Trans-Siberian this year!”)

No big deal. It’s still great news!

For more information on any of the above, call us at (800) 478-4881 or (502) 897-1725. Email us at tourdesk@irtsociety.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Tale of a Sea Cloud Voyage: The Magic Was in the Sailing

19 Sep
The Sea Cloud's distinctive square sails billow against a cloud-filled sky. IRT Photo by R. Fisher

The Sea Cloud’s distinctive square sails billow against a cloud-filled sky. IRT Photo by R. Fisher

When Cathy Jackson entered her Sea Cloud cabin, she burst into tears.

“Don’t you like your room?” implored the steward. “You don’t like the white?”

Quite the contrary, she replied. “I love it! I feel as if I were inside a wedding cake!”

Her husband Clay had surprised her with Cabin No. 1, the lavish personal quarters of none other than Marjorie Merriweather Post.  Cathy said she felt like a princess.

Sea Cloud sailors climb the ratlines. IRT Photo by R. Fisher

Sea Cloud sailors climb the ratlines. IRT Photo by R. Fisher

The Sea Cloud is that kind of ship: a one-of-a-kind fairy tale masterpiece of marine design. Built in 1931 and still going strong, the four-masted bark is the world’s last authentic square-rigged luxury sailing yacht.

Since I am an old sailor, I jumped at the chance to sail the Sea Cloud, and arrange for a lively group of Society of International Railway Travelers guests to join us. It was a huge success.

Our route was a dream: from Dubrovnik, Croatia down the Dalmatian Coast to Athens, Greece.  We sailed the Adriatic, the Ionian and the Aegean seas. But it was the ship itself that lured me away from my familiar railway haunts.

As befitting a multi-millionaire’s yacht, the Sea Cloud is a work of art on water. And the 84-year-old, 360-foot sailing ship is surprisingly comfortable as well.

From the smallest cabin to the 8 original “guest cabins” below decks to the two owners’ suites – the aforementioned white-and-gold Mrs. Post confection and the darker, decidedly masculine quarters of Marjorie’s then husband, E.F. Hutton – most were masterpieces of planning as well as décor.

Our twin-bedded room had ample storage space in a variety of lockers, and bureaus and under the beds as well as a large hanging closet — with 22 hangers.

Detail from Sea Cloud Cabin No. 1 — Marjorie Merriweather Post's personal suite. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

Detail from Sea Cloud Cabin No. 1 — Marjorie Merriweather Post’s personal suite. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

The marble bathroom was small but efficient. It had multiple brass towel racks, pegs and hooks, ample storage space under the sink for toiletries, and a powerful shower that rivaled most on land.

The food also was ample and delicious, reflecting the cuisines of the areas through which we passed: Croatia, Montenegro, Albania and Greece.

Fresh-from-the-seas fish, octopus, calamari, shrimp, scampi and more – not to mention the freshest salads and local cheeses and fruits were staples of the cruise.

A smoked ham, for example, came straight from a smokehouse atop Montenegro’s mountains. The Croatian wines — both whites and reds — were fabulous.

No one possibly could have gone hungry. Nor could they complain about the very well-stocked bar on the lido deck.

“Bebot” Roldan, a 33-year Sea Cloud veteran, is a master “mixologist.” And he’d stocked his bar with many a premium spirit, including “Carlos Primero,” a favorite brandy of IRT’s guests Olga & Orlando Herrera and José and Maria Becerra Martin. Their fame for warm hospitality and friendship quickly spread to our entire group (we were 14 in all).

Sea Cloud crew member cleaning up in the galley after lunch. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

Sea Cloud crew member cleaning up in the galley after lunch. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

The Orient-Express of the Seas is how I’ve described the Sea Cloud, based on its rich history and stunning décor. But the similarity also can be seen in the professionalism of the personnel.

The Sea Cloud’s captain and crew, coupled with the dedication of the Lindblad team, made for an even more seamless experience.

When the young deck hands weren’t scampering up the rigging to set the sails, they were varnishing, painting and repairing, and doing the thousands of other tasks sailors have done for centuries. And they did it all with smiles and enthusiasm.

Meal and cabin service was equally professional and warm. And it would be hard to find anyone more enthusiastic than Tom O’Brien, the congenial and professional Lindblad expeditions leader, who seemed to live and breathe the romantic life of square-rigged sailing.

The Sea Cloud is a remarkably stable ship. We encountered rough seas one or two times. But her relatively small size – she carries a maximum of just 64 passengers – means she can duck into coves and inlets too shallow for the big cruise ships.

We covered an amazing amount of territory in just 10 days. We visited quaint villages, vibrant harbors and a host of World Heritage Sites from ancient Greek and Roman times. (Click here for our itinerary.)

The Sea Cloud as seen from the ramparts of Dubrovnik's city walls. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

The Sea Cloud as seen from the ramparts of Dubrovnik’s city walls. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

Best of all were the voyage’s final two days, which were reserved for “pure sailing.” Captain Sergey Konstantin ordered his men aloft to set our principal square sails. Suddenly, the ship’s auxiliary engines fell silent.

And there we were, much like the square-riggers of old: our bow cutting through the waves, the wake roiling from the stern and the ship’s standards snapping smartly in the stiff breeze.

For the strong-willed few who made it up to catch the sunrise (I did so only once), it was a magical sight to see the dawn come up over the Aegean with the ship under full sail.

The effect was mesmerizing. This was the way it used to be: in Marjorie Merriweather Post’s time – and for much of maritime history.

Reviews from Society of International Railway Travelers guests were raves. They’re not giving up their love of train trips — but they loved this ship.

“What a great trip!” said R. Fisher, of Arlington, Va., in an email earlier this week.

Sea Cloud lines. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

Sea Cloud lines. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

“I loved the shore excursions, as always…But the thing I’ll remember is being aboard that ship. And watching the sailors unfurl the sails, and the way the sails billowed and flapped. What a sight. It’s one I never expected to experience. All thanks to IRT.”

Comparing notes with others on board, I learned that most passengers booked the Sea Cloud one to two years before departure. We blocked space on the journey two years ago — and we are doing it again for 2017.

If you want to sample this amazing small-ship venue, please call us right away – for 2017. (Some space exists in 2016 for other itineraries.)

To contact us, call 800-478-4881 or 502-897 1725. Or email us:                tourdesk@irtsociety.com. For more photos, click here.

%d bloggers like this: