Archive by Author

Exotic Luxury Train Tour: A Caspian Odyssey with Angela

28 Sep
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Photo courtesy of Golden Eagle Luxury Trains.

Mt. Ararat (above), reputed resting place of Noah’s Ark, towers over Yerevan, Armenia. It’s the jumping-off point for the Caspian Odyssey Along the Ancient Silk Road tour.

The 16-day tour visits Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Kazakhstan — and includes a ferry crossing of the Caspian Sea.

It’s one of the Golden Eagle luxury train’s most exotic tours.

IRT’s Angela Walker, Vice President for Operations, accompanied a group of our travelers on the Caspian Odyssey several years ago.

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Photo courtesy of Golden Eagle Luxury Trains.

Below, we present a few of Angela’s photos and impressions:

The Golden Eagle — with its young staff —was a comfortable home for our journey through six countries and cultures. It provided all the comforts of home — and plenty of vodka!

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IRT Photo courtesy of Angela Walker.

My fellow travelers were high-spirited and great fun. Here we are in Samarkand, wearing traditional Uzbek hats during a local fashion show.

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IRT Photo by Angela Walker.

I snapped this photo of a darling little girl during a serendipitous moment in Ashkabat, Turkmenistan.

During a regular tour stop, a wedding party suddenly pulled up honking in several decorated cars. Dressed in colorful costumes, they danced and celebrated as they happily welcomed us to join in. It was wonderful to interact with the locals in such a special way.

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IRT Photo by Angela Walker.

In Almaty, Kazakhstan, next to the WWII memorial, I spied these adorable children mimicking the marching soldiers.

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IRT Photo by Angela Walker.

In the hills outside of Almaty, we were greeted by men in traditional costumes showing how they use their birds for hunting.

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IRT Photo by Angela Walker.

These four delightful ladies in our group were friends from Peru and Argentina. Here, they enjoy the train’s lounge car—especially its lively pianist, who entertained nightly.

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IRT Photo courtesy of Angela Walker.

Here I am visiting “The Door to Hell” — a gigantic gas crater in the middle of Uzbekistan’s Kara Kum desert, which has been burning for over 40 years.

It was so exciting to drive out to the Darvaza gas crater, in the pitch-black night, to see this site — essentially, a giant hole of fire burning in the middle of nowhere.

And to know that it’s been burning since 1971 — I don’t think there’s anything like it in the world!

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IRT photo courtesy of Angela Walker.

Home, sweet home. After a day of touring along the Caspian Odyssey’s incredible path, it was always great to return to the Golden Eagle and my private, en-suite quarters.

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IRT Photo by Angela Walker.

Time for a refreshing drink! In this case, a sampling of one of the Golden Eagle’s special vodkas.

• • •

The 16-day, escorted tour operates just once a year. Next year’s dates are Sept. 19 – Oct. 4. In 2020, the tour runs Sept. 24 – Oct. 9.  If you book the 2020 journey before Dec. 31 this year, enjoy 2019 pricing.  

To see the complete itinerary, click here. For prices, click here.

To book, call us at (800) 478-4881 (+1 502-897-1725 if outside the US/Canada), or e-mail us.

We look forward to welcoming you aboard!

Angela Walker is Vice President, Operations and senior luxury travel advisor for The Society of International Railway Travelers. This is Ms. Walker’s 20th year with IRT, and she has traveled on most of the World’s Top 25 Trains.

 

IRT Founder’s Ardent Wish? Celebrate New Year’s Eve in Vienna with Golden Eagle Danube Express

11 Sep
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Viennese dancers on New Year’s Eve at the Rathaus, Vienna’s lovely City Hall.

We sat down with The Society of International Railway Travelers’ founder and CEO, Mr. Owen Hardy, to discuss his ardent desire to celebrate New Year’s Eve in Vienna with the Golden Eagle Danube Express. Tour dates are December 28, 2018 – January 5, 2019. Click here for itinerary details.

Mr. Hardy, please tell us why you “simply must” go on the “New Year in Vienna” trip on the Golden Eagle Danube Express?

Officially, I have four reasons: Budapest, Vienna, Prague and the Viennese New Year celebration.

Unofficially, movies. Specifically, Wes Anderson’s “The Grand Budapest Hotel” and Orson Welles’ “The Third Man.”

 

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Pictured left: diners enjoy New Year’s Eve gala dinner at Rathaus City Hall in Vienna.         Pictured right: a festive, snow-capped Vienna.

 

Say that again? These films aren’t your typical happy tourist fare.

I know, I know. But they exude a delicious atmosphere of romance, love and artistic grit that I project onto their respective cities.

Plus, I love music of all kinds, especially classical, and these cities overflow with it – even on the street corners.

And I love Vienna’s Secessionist or Wiener Werkstaette art movement, examples of which can be found not only in Vienna but also in Budapest and Prague.

What about the train itself?

In my student years, I crisscrossed Europe with a Eurailpass, sleeping next to strangers in couchettes night after night. But these days, I like my creature comforts.

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Brand-new Superior Deluxe cabins aboard the Golden Eagle Danube Express feature a private bathroom and shower with all the amenities, large double bed, and sitting area. Not pictured: private Wi-Fi that comes with every Superior Deluxe cabin.

A Superior Deluxe cabin (click here for full cabin details) with large double bed, fully en-suite bathroom and shower, and sitting area would do quite nicely — and the three included nights at Budapest’s palatial Four Seasons Hotel Gresham Palace would not disappoint, either. (Tip: don’t miss the top-notch spa at the Four Seasons Gresham Palace.)

Another highlight from the itinerary, in your opinion?

The night at the opera at Prague’s Karlin Music Theatre will be an extra-special event.

Plus, Prague overflows with stunning architecture. My last tour guide in Prague said she’d lived her whole life in the city but had only scraped the surface of its wonders. I believe her.

 

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Prague’s Charles Bridge at dawn.

 

So what do you suggest our guests do?

Call us (if you’re a Luddite like me) at (800) 478-4881  — +1 502-897-1725 if outside the US / Canada. Everyone else, please email us at tourdesk@irtsociety.com.

Anything else you want to say (and make it short!)?

Life is short. Old age creeps up on you. Go waltzing in Vienna at midnight on New Year’s Eve.

I guarantee you won’t regret it!


Owen C. Hardy is the CEO, founder, and co-owner of The Society of International Railway Travelers.

The New Year’s in Vienna tour runs December 28, 2018 – January 5, 2019. Click here for full itinerary details and pricing. Click here for details of the Golden Eagle Danube Express train.

To book your space on the New Year’s in Vienna tour, call (800) 478-4881 or +1 502-897-1725, or email us at tourdesk@irtsociety.com.

 

IRT On Tour: VSOE Grand Suites, Rovos Rail, Shongololo Express, more

8 Mar
Rovos Rail's Pride of Africa. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy.

Rovos Rail’s Pride of Africa. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy.

IRT’s Angela Walker and Rachel Hardy are about to embark on a three-week
learning tour spanning two continents to investigate the newest developments in
luxury rail travel.

We checked in with them while they were furiously packing to ask: What about your upcoming study tour has you most excited?

Angela: I am eager to experience Rovos Rail’s Pride of Africa after helping IRT travelers take the train for many years – especially knowing how beloved it is by past guests. I especially look forward to meals in the beautiful dining cars and watching the scenery roll by from the open-air observation deck.

I’ll also be testing out Rovos Rail’s new sister train – Shongololo Express – on an
in-depth 15-day tour of South Africa.

The Pride of Africa has been a World’s Top 25 Train since the beginning, and
Shongololo Express may be awarded this elite honor after we’ve tested it. Stay tuned!

Grand Suite 'Venice' on the Venice-Simplon-Orient-Express.

Grand Suite ‘Venice’ on the Venice-Simplon-Orient-Express.

Rachel: I can’t wait to see the three brand-new, super-exclusive Grand Suites on
the Venice Simplon-Orient- Express. I’ll be among a very small group to see the
Suites on their inaugural trip from Venice to London. Pictures and full report to
follow.

I’m also excited to test out the services of our great travel partners who are arranging crucial trip elements — in Europe and in South Africa — such as VIP Meet & Greet airport transfers, private guided sightseeing, unique dining and more.

Angela and I will also be visiting a host of 5-star Virtuoso properties:

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Saxon Hotel in Johannesburg

Cape Town-
Cape Grace Hotel
Belmond Mount Nelson Hotel

Johannesburg-

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Belmond Hotel Cipriani in Venice.

Saxon Hotel
Fairlawns Hotel

London-
The Milestone Hotel

Venice-
Belmond Hotel Cipriani
Baglioni Hotel Luna

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Belmond Mount Nelson Hotel in Cape Town.

Check in with Angela and Rachel on IRT’s Facebook page for updates throughout their travels, and look out for posts on IRT’s Track 25 blog after they return in mid-April.

If you have burning questions for them about any of the trains or
hotels they’ll be visiting, e-mail IRT’s main inbox at:
tourdesk@irtsociety.com. They’ll do their best to get an answer for you!

Ready to book your own luxury rail adventure?

Call us at 1-800-478-4881 (1-502-897-1725 if outside the US/Canada) or e-mail us at tourdesk@irtsociety.com.

Angela Walker is Vice President, Operations and a luxury travel advisor. This is her 2oth year with The Society of International Railway Travelers. Read all about Angela here.  Rachel Hardy, Vice President, Sales & Marketing and luxury travel advisor is celebrating her 3rd anniversary with IRT. Read all about Rachel here. 

Murder on the Orient Express: Stunning Outside, Blah Inside

4 Dec
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20th Century Fox photo

Our phones are ringing off the hook.

Much of it’s due to the film remake of Agatha Christie’s 1934 who-done-it, “Murder on the Orient Express.” It opened in U.S. theaters Nov. 10.

The movie has been thoroughly reviewed by the general press, with major critics less than thrilled. If I were still a newspaper critic (which I was in a past life), I’d begin by saying it’s too long by at least 15-20 minutes.

The film is brilliant when the train exterior is center stage in the “mountains of Eastern Europe” (It was, in fact, shot entirely at a film studio outside London).

IRT Travelers on the VSOE.

IRT Travelers on the Train of Kings, the King of Trains.

Pulled by a magnificent steam engine, the train is bathed in blue and white moonlight, with the camera soaring down one mountain peak and up another, as if carried by an eagle (or a drone).

The film’s Orient Express glides around mountains, beset by flashing lightning bursts and menacing clouds, clinging precariously to cliffs, seemingly thousands of feet above steep gorges.

These panoramic scenes show luxury trains at their best—as almost otherworldly experiences, whose train-window views are incomparable and life-changing.

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Taking the perfect photo on the Belmond Royal Scotsman’s outdoor rear platform — another of our World’s Top 25 Trains. IRT photo by Eleanor Hardy

But inside—and unlike the real luxury trains we represent —the movie Orient Express falls flat. There’s hardly any fancy furniture or gleaming brass; no discernible marquetry. The cutlery looks utilitarian; the china and crystal are uninspiring.

While there are some Art Deco accents—vaguely “Lalique-ish” sconces resembling ice sculptures adorn the movie-train walls; along with convincingly retro luggage racks—the overall color scheme ranges from dull tweed to brown.

Conversely, you can’t beat the star-studded cast. Convincingly dressed in period costume, with Cole Porter’s “I Get a Kick Out of You” in the background, they are brash, mysterious, gaudy, sexy — and thoroughly awash in “guilty” looks.

But there isn’t much for them to do when Poirot’s not grilling them, aside from glancing suspiciously at one another. Mostly, they just look bored. (C’mon, folks, have some fun. You’re on a luxury train!)

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Ecuador’s Tren Crucero also boasts a rear, outdoor viewing platform. IRT Photo by Eleanor Hardy

And as far as accuracy goes, I’m dubious. In my 35 years of working in the luxury train world, I’ve never heard of a rear, open platform* on the original Orient Express in any of its iterations, as it’s shown in the film. (Please email me if you know otherwise.).

So go see “Murder on the Orient Express.” The “outdoor” train scenes alone are worth the price of admission.

But don’t commit the crime of not trying out a luxury train for yourself.

Check our list of The World’s Top 25 Trains, then  email us, or give us a call: (800) 478-4881 or (502) 897-1725.

*We at IRT love open, outdoor platforms. Among our “World’s Top 25 Trains®,” open-air platforms are available on Rovos Rail’s “The Pride of Africa,” the “Belmond Royal Scotsman,” the Bangkok-Singapore “Eastern & Oriental Express” (also a Belmond train), the “Rocky Mountaineer” in Canada, Peru’s “Belmond Andean Explorer” and “Belmond Hiram Bingham” and Ecuador’s “Tren Crucero.”

 

The Venice Simplon-Orient-Express Goes Big in 2018

15 Sep

Want to travel on the Venice Simplon-Orient-Express (VSOE) next year?

You’re not alone.

This fall, the latest “Murder on the Orient Express” film debuts.

And next year, the VSOE celebrates the 20th anniversary of its annual Paris-Istanbul journey, says its operator, Belmond.

Three brand-new Grand Suites will be on all VSOE departures beginning in 2018.

Three brand-new Grand Suites will be on all VSOE departures beginning in 2018. Shown above: Grand Suite Venice.

The train is celebrating its milestone year with a host of improvements to the train and its itineraries. New for 2018:

Grand Suites: Currently under construction, the VSOE’s Grand Suites will offer guests over-the-top accommodations, including double bed, sitting room, and private shower, sink and toilet — a first for the 1920s-vintage train.

Grand Suites are sold out for next year’s 6-day, 5-night annual Paris-Istanbul / Istanbul-Paris journeys. (Contact us now to get on the 2019 Grand Suite wait list for either of these annual journeys.)

Limited Grand Suite space remains on the VSOE’s 2018 trips to Vienna, Budapest, Prague and Berlin. For more on the Grand Suites, click here.

IRT Travelers on the VSOE.

IRT Travelers on the VSOE.

Steam Engine: The VSOE’s Venice-Budapest trips will be hauled by a Hungarian MAV 424.247 steam locomotive for the last half-hour of its three 2018 journeys in May, September and October.

The powerful locomotive was built in Budapest’s MÁVAG factory after the Second World War.

“The noise, the smell, the evocative imagery… conjuring up Agatha Christie and the movies,” says VSOE general manager Pascal Deyrolle. “It’s everybody’s dream when it comes to travelling on the Venice Simplon-Orient-Express.”

The MAVs were nicknamed bivaly (buffalo) by the railway workers and, according to Deyrolle, you can see why.

“The engine is massive! It’s quite a shock when you first see it. We forget how huge this machinery was. A wheel is as high as a man! It’s an impressive beast.”

The VSOE in Gothard, Switzerland. Photo by Belmond.

The VSOE in Gothard, Switzerland. Photo by Belmond.

More Mountains: New, earlier departure times — 2 p.m. instead of 6 p.m. — on VSOE trips departing from Venice to Prague, Vienna and Budapest mean more time on the train and spectacular mountain scenery, Belmond says.

Grand Tour: Really want to do it up big? The 8-day “Grand Tour” of Europe begins with an overnight trip on the VSOE from London or Paris to Venice. After two days in the “Floating City,” continue on the train to Prague, Vienna or Budapest, before re-joining the train once again for your return overnight trip to Paris or London. Contact us for details.

1930s Berlin: VSOE specialist Lucy Clark describes the train’s annual London/Paris-Berlin journeys as “edgy.”

dsc_0273-vsoe-lamp“On board, it feels a bit different,” from the typical VSOE excursion, she says. “We get more culturally curious passengers. Maybe it’s the jazz band we have on board, or the different uniforms the staff wears.”

Whatever it is, the trip is unique, she says.

“The stretch along the 120 kilometers of the Rhineland gorge is absolutely beautiful. The vineyard-covered cliffs, the castles…and of course, Cologne, with its magnificent cathedral…it offers a unique charm.”

For more information, contact The Society of International Railway Travelers®. US & Canada, call (800) 478-4881; everywhere else, call (502) 897-1725. Email tourdesk@irtsociety.com.

To submit a booking request online, click here.

Rovos Rail’s “Pride of Africa”: 30+ Years of Luxury Adventure

28 Jul
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The Pride of Africa’s wood-paneled bar car boasts comfortable seating, a convivial atmosphere and – best of all – a large, rear outdoor deck, perfect for viewing the wild African landscape. Photo by Nels Freeman

Rovos Rail’s 15-day Cape Town – Dar es Salaam “luxury adventure” ranks among the top 5 rail trips for many IRT travelers.

“That’s probably still our favorite trip,” T. Hoberg of Cincinnati, who has booked 19 trips with IRT, told us today.

But for Alicia Taljaard, Rovos’ Sales and Marketing executive, her favorite is the shorter African Collage.  (And it will be the IRT Society’s Owner’s Choice itinerary in 2019, departing Pretoria Oct. 30 — click here for more info.)

“It’s our most scenic trip,” says the 13-year Rovos Rail veteran, who’s a regular visitor to the IRT office.

“It’s perfect for the safari enthusiast, and the scenery on that trip is unbeatable.

South Africa's Garden Route is unbeatable for its scenery, which ranges from towering mountains to dramatic seashores. IRT Photo by John Fiorilla

South Africa’s Garden Route is unbeatable for its scenery, which ranges from towering mountains to dramatic seashores. IRT Photo by John Fiorilla

“You have the mountain passes and the Garden Route, a very lush, beautiful area along the coastline of the eastern to western Cape.

“Then there’s the vineyards and the ocean…” Continue reading

Ecuador’s Tren Crucero: Magic Carpet Ride in a Beautiful Land

14 Jul
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IRT’s Owen Hardy snaps a photo from the Tren Crucero’s rear observation car. IRT Photo by Eleanor Hardy

In my next life, I want to return as an Ecuadoran railway worker. Or maybe a wedding planner.

Eleanor and I met both types during our recent trip on Ecuador’s “Tren Crucero,”

From the brakeman, to the general manager, to the young man who tailed our train on a motorcycle, making sure the crossings were clear, the railway personnel couldn’t have been more engaged and professional.

“The railway is the symbol of the country,” said General Manager Ana Garcia Pando. “When the railway came, the country became one.” Their pride shows throughout.

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Tren Crucero staff give the thumbs up. From left, David Balarezo, Ana Valeria Barragan and Diego Vera.  TC staff is professional, cheerful and enthusiastic.  IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

Indeed, the train workers seemed delighted with and proud of their mission — to show off, via the railway and local vendors, their beautiful country and people, and their amazing rail system, with all its varied landscapes — from the mountains and volcanoes to the sea.

And the wedding planners? More about them later.

Ecuador’s Tren Crucero (Cruise Train) was one of two South American beauties that recently won the IRT Society’s “World’s Top 25 Train” status (the other was Peru’s Belmond Andean Explorer).

 

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“Someday, maybe I can work on the Tren Crucero,” this young Ecuadoran boy might be thinking. IRT photo by Owen Hardy

IRT Society President Eleanor Hardy and I sampled both several months ago on a whirlwind, 21-day inspection tour.

Unlike most of our “World’s Top 25 Trains,” whose guests sleep aboard in comfy quarters, the Tren Crucero is a day train.

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Tren Ecuador Marketing Manager Alex Ortiz smiles from the Tren Crucero rear outdoor observation platform. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

Travelers sleep at comfortable hotels or haciendas at night. (And if you opt for the new Tren Crucero Gold class, the hotels are palatial.)

Sleeping off the train did cause one downside — early-morning wake-up calls. To see and do all we did, and given the typical afternoon rain showers, I understood the need. Still, I grumbled at sunrise reveilles.

But once on board, I was happy I got up early to see the magnificent scenery — under bright-blue skies.

Conclusion: The bright-red Tren Crucero is worth the occasional bleary eye.

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Gorgeous roses grace each passenger’s window on the Tren Crucero. IRT photo by Owen Hardy

Meanwhile, the Tren Crucero’s rear-car outdoor viewing platform is gigantic. It boasts two other observation cars with double rows of windows, plus more in the roof for viewing Ecuador’s dizzying heights. It has a well-stocked dining car. And two cars boast comfortable seating at tables for two.

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A woman in traditional dress at a local market greets a friend. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

Plus, to compensate for the lack of personal sleeping quarters, guests have private lockers where they can stash their valuables. That especially helps promote peace of mind when they’re sightseeing off-train.

 

In short, the entire train is gorgeous.

And off the train, the tours are varied and fabulous.

Our favorites?

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A Tren Crucero employee shows off the one of the railway’s 23 track-side coffee shops at Chimbacalle Station., where you can buy locally made snacks and crafts. IRT Photo by Eleanor Hardy

Gardeners that we are, Eleanor and I loved our visit to Hacienda La Compania de Jesus, in the same family for six generations, and its rose plantation,  Rosadex, in the lush volcanic valley of Cayambe, north of Quito.

The stunning crops were gigantic, long-stemmed roses that are shipped all over the world. (And being near the equator, they stretch for the sun, growing ramrod-straight.) They produce 21 million roses a year.

Our lunch at the 300-year-old hacienda–with giant bouquets of roses everywhere–was delicious, and the tour led by Juan Martin Perujo, one of the owners, fascinating.

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Tren Crucero passengers encircle a quishuar tree, which the Incas regarded as sacred. IRT Photo

We took a short hike through El Boliche national park, altitude 11,637 feet, and joined a “group tree hug.” (At 11,637 feet, however, some of us were huffing like steam engines.)

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IRT president Eleanor Hardy at Guamote traditional market. The Tren Crucero passengers had just finished a fascinating walk through the market.  IRT Photo by Owen Hardy

We tromped through a traditional market, obviously away from well-trodden tourist venues, and rubbed shoulders with locals dressed in their colorful native costume.

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Owen and Eleanor Hardy with the “Last Ice Merchant” and his daughter at the Urbina Station, 11,841 feet altitude.  He is believed to be the last practitioner of the fine art of hacking huge chunks of glacial ice and carting them to local markets. IRT Photo

Especially memorable — we met the last Ice Merchant, Baltazar Ushca, 72 years old and still working. We were thrilled to see a great movie about him – and then to get to meet him and his daughter.

He is the last of his generation to trudge up Mount Chimborazo — at 20,548 feet, Ecuador’s tallest mountain — to hack out huge blocks of ice, by hand, to sell in the valley’s local market.

And — train-lovers that we are — we loved our rides behind two restored Baldwin steam engines.

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Tren Ecuador’s plucky steam engine number 11, built by Baldwin. IRT photo by Owen Hardy

Still, Our favorite activity was simply gazing at Ecuador’s gorgeous scenery from Tren Crucero‘s outdoor rear platform .

We saw volcanoes, glaciers, towering mountains, rushing rivers, multi-colored quinoa fields, bustling cities and towns, and, everywhere, waving locals, smiling with obvious pride in “their” railway.

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One of our wedding planner friends, Sophie Paz Barlovento, shows off her lunch, served in artfully decorated baskets.  The lunches and the baskets were all created in the nearby community. IRT Photo by Eleanor Hardy

They have every right to be proud.

In 2008, following years of decline, the Ecuadorian railway system was declared a “national cultural patrimony” by President Rafael Correa.

Rather than condemn his country’s trains to the scrap heap, Correa vowed to restore the railway as a public corporation. Ecuador Railways (Tren Ecuador) is the result.

And while the 2013-built Tren Crucero might get most of the publicity, it’s just the most obvious in a continuing, nationwide effort: to harness the railway for the cultural, economic, social and touristic benefit of the entire country.

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Gorgeous roses adorn a table at the Hacienda La Compania de Jesus and rose plantation Rosadex, where we had lunch and were treated to rose farm tour by one of the owners. IRT photo by Owen Hardy

Indeed, Ecuador has spent $450 million on improvements. It’s restored more than 300 miles of track and 25 stations. It boasts 11 diesel-electric locomotives and has a variety of rolling stock for use with its out-and-back day trains (which it calls “Expedition Trains”).

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Typical Ecuadoran skyline, as seen from the rear of the Tren Crucero. IRT Photo by Eleanor Hardy

They include six running in the Northern, Central and Southern Andes and three on the Pacific coast (two of which — the Chocolate and Sweets trains — sound particularly tasty, given Ecuador’s reputation for producing world-class chocolate).

Finally, in addition to the Tren Crucero, the railroad’s pride and joy are its seven, lovingly restored steam engines, which it runs at every opportunity.

“In the small towns, when they hear the steam engine, they flock around. They never get tired of it,” says general manager Pando.

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Tren Crucero station poster. IRT photo by Eleanor Hardy

Tren Ecuador has been so vigorous in pursuit of its mission, in fact, that it was a joint recipient in winning last year’s “World Responsible Tourism Award” in London.

Meanwhile, back on the Tren Crucero, we had problems. Bad weather forced a change in plans.

Because of heavy rains and accompanying track washouts, we sometimes had to ride buses between railway stations. But as a result, that gave us the opportunity to experience a variety of Tren Ecuador rolling stock. It also allowed us to see how they manage issues — and we have to say: they did it brilliantly and with aplomb.

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Tren Ecuador train trundles along the switchback-laden route of the famous “Devil’s Nose” railway. IRT photo by Owen Hardy

Our experience will prove helpful when we advise clients bound for Ecuador – because we highly recommend including the highlands — and Tren Ecuador and its many possibilities — on its own, or as an add-on to the Galapagos Islands.

Even if you don’t have time for the full Tren Crucero experience, we’ll recommend you stop over in Quito and/or Guayaquil and ride a day train or two.

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At Ambato Station, we loved a spirited dance by a local family, decked out in fantastical masks and costumes — and serving a potent local liquor.  The family has made these costumes and performed for generations. IRT photo by Owen Hardy

(Indeed, there’s much more to see and do in Ecuador. Some other time, I’ll tell you about an incredible “eco-resort” tucked into a cloud forest— Mashpi Lodge. Or about Quito’s fabulous Hotel Casa Gangotena, and the tour it arranged for us at a nearby cathedral bell tower, given by one of the jolliest Franciscan monks I’ve ever met.)

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Tren Crucero machinist Javier Dominguez pauses for a quick publicity shot. IRT photo by Eleanor Hardy

Oh, and one more thing: as I said earlier: if you can swing it, try to book your Tren Crucero ride with a bunch of Ecuadoran wedding planners (in our case, we were just lucky.).

These people rock.

One afternoon, I wandered back to the Tren Crucero’s rear platform.

I was quickly joined by a dozen or so young Ecuadoran men and women. They were checking out the train as a wedding venue (great idea, incidentally).

“Oh, no,” I thought. “These folks are half my age. Time to join the oldsters inside.”

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These wedding planners – and several singers – provided nonstop fun on our Tren Crucero trip. IRT photo by Owen Hardy

But then they began singing, dancing — and insisting that I join them.

What could I do? I did join them — and had a blast. For a moment, I was 25 again.

My conclusion?

That’s Ecuador  — and Tren Crucero— in a nutshell. They truly live up to the country’s motto: “ama la vida” (love life), on the train and off.

Videos: To view the Tren Crucero behind a steam locomotive, click here. To see it cross a high bridge from the rear platform, click here. IRT videos by Eleanor Hardy.

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